Amir eager to complete ‘unfinished business’

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Pakistan fast bowler Mohammad Amir last played a Test in 2010, at Lord's, and he will return to the ground at which he committed the crime of spot fixing, determined to show he's more than a cheat.

Amir was banned for five years for his role in the fixing scandal at Lord's six years ago, and his coincidental comeback will be at the same ground in London when they face England next month.

Amir, who is the only one of the three players convicted that time (Salman Butt and Mohammad Asif have not been recalled) to return, knows he is fortunate to get a second chance, given he was only a teenager at the time, and has years left in him.

The 24-year-old said on Cricinfo: "To be honest I never thought about my comeback and I feel terribly lucky to be back to play Test cricket again. 

"I was all excited for Test cricket because that is where my career was held back and I still can't believe that this is happening. You call it a coincidence or whatever, but to me it is a blessing that I am starting right from where I stopped in 2010. 

"That tour was marred by the controversy and that left me with unfinished business. My only aim is to be the best bowler of the series, get Pakistan to win the series, and sign off with fresh memories."

While Amir has been back for Pakistan in the shorter formats for a few months already, he considers Test cricket his proper comeback, and is determined not to let fan reactions or the media mar his return.

He added: "I might have registered my comeback months ago, but Test cricket is the actual cricket, and playing it again is what I was looking forward to, and this is my real comeback. 

"I won't say that I have forgotten my past, as my memory still holds those ugly moments from 2010, but I want to perform well. I want to get my name on the honours board at Lord's once again to win back the love and support in England. 

"I am looking at this tour positively as I want to supersede my past with a better future."

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